Fresh Vegetables

Fresh Vegetables

Showing all 7 results

  • Zucchini

    As implied by the term summer squash, zucchini's prime season is May to August, although they are now available year-round. Summer squash has a thin, soft skin and soft edible seeds, whereas winter squash has a hard skin. The zucchini is a long, cylindrical vegetable, slightly smaller at the stem end, usually dark green in color. The flesh is a pale greenish-white and has a delicate, almost sweet flavor. Zucchini fruit grows quickly and is harvested within 2 to 7 days of flowering. Newer varieties include the golden zucchini and the globe or round zucchini. The golden variety is somewhat milder in taste than the dark green. The globe variety is about the size of a softball, about 3 inches in diameter -- perfect for stuffing. Zucchini is not to be confused with marrow squash (also called vegetable marrow) which looks like a larger, more round version of the zucchini with white stripes.
  • Cauliflower

    Cauliflower is made up of tightly bound clusters of florets that form a dense head, similar to that of broccoli. Resembling a classic tree in shape the clusters sprout from stems which are attached to a singular central white trunk. The stems and trunk are firm and tender and the florets have a dense yet soft and crumbly texture. Its flavor is mild with subtle cruciferous and nutty sweet nuances, a taste which is amplified when roasted. The entire cauliflower, its leaves, trunk, stems and florets are all edible. Cauliflower is available year-round with a peak season during late winter months.
  • Fennel

    Fennel is crunchy and slightly sweet, adding a refreshing contribution to the ever popular Mediterranean cuisine. Most often associated with Italian cooking, be sure to add this to your selection of fresh vegetables from the autumn through early spring when it is readily available and at its best. Fennel is composed of a white or pale green bulb from which closely superimposed stalks are arranged. The stalks are topped with feathery green leaves near which flowers grow and produce fennel seeds. The bulb, stalk, leaves and seeds are all edible. Fennel belongs to the Umbellifereae family and is therefore closely related to parsley, carrots, dill and coriander.
  • Red cabbage

    The red cabbage, also called purple cabbage, is an edible cabbage of a highly appreciated slightly sweet taste, characterized by the beautiful purple, magenta or dark purple colour of its leaves. This variety is bred from the common cabbage cultivated all over Tunisia and found all the year round. It is cultivated, cooked and eaten as the rest of cabbages.
  • Green cabbage

    Green cabbage has tightly enveloped superimposed pale green leaves, with variations of pea green colorings. Their thick, broad, deeply veined and waxy in their finish. The flavor of Green cabbage is grassy, sweet and cruciferous, a trademark characteristic of cabbage. Green cabbage can reach six to seven inches in diameter and weigh up to 10 pounds. Green cabbage is available year-round.
  • Green beans

    Green beans are the unripe, young fruit and protective pods of various cultivars of the common bean . Green beans are known by many common names, including French beans,string beans and the French name haricot vert. They are distinguished from the many other varieties of beans in that green beans are harvested and consumed with their enclosing pods, before the bean seeds inside have fully matured.
  • Green artichokes

    The globe artichoke, also known as French artichoke and green artichoke i, is a variety of a species of thistle cultivated as a food. The edible portion of the plant consists of the flower buds before the flowers come into bloom. The budding artichoke flower-head is a cluster of many budding small flowers (an inflorescence), together with many bracts, on an edible base. Once the buds bloom, the structure changes to a coarse, barely edible form. Another variety of the same species is the cardoon, a perennial plant native to the Mediterranean region. Both wild forms and cultivated varieties (cultivars) exist.